Another Truism

“That which government cannot force you to do because of Constitutional- or legal prohibition, it will force your employer to do on their behalf.”

Such as with the execrable “voluntary” wellness programs (whatever the fuck that means).  Thank goodness I don’t work for Global MegaCorp Inc. anymore, or else I’d burn out the pic below (which I’d be constantly sending in response to their latest poxy diktat ):

Reaction Part 2

Here’s an interesting little snippet:  about nine people a day are being arrested by British officials for the crime of posting “offensive messages online.”

Such “offense” is seldom actually defined (vagueness being the root of all tyranny), unless we include the qualifier “it hurt some ultra-sensitive asswipe’s feeewings” in the casus praehendum.

It’s a good thing I don’t live in the U.K., or else I’d no doubt get visited by the rozzers just for expressing my reaction to, for example, the South Yorkshire Police, who posted this bullshit:

Hate will not be tolerated in South Yorkshire. Report it and put a stop to it.

Here’s my response:

And that goes for all you little PC scolds, tattletales and snowflakes out there as well.

Hate, you assholes?  I’ll show you hate.  A pox on all of you.

Truism

“You may make a bad mistake;  the company you work for can make an even worse mistake;  but to really screw things up, you need government.”

Kim’s Corollary:

“…and the higher the level of government, the exponentially-greater the mistake will be.”

Hence the recent pronouncement which basically states that absolutely everything the fucking federal government has ever told you about health and nutrition, is wrong.  Not just wrong, but catastrophically wrong.

As I’ve said countless times before:  I longer believe anything the government — any level of government — tells me, whatever the topic.

And if we want to wander into the Tinfoil Hat Forest ever so slightly, we may note that in the above case, the beneficiaries of said bad governmental advice have been the pharmaceutical companies who, incidentally, hire lobbyists and donate barrow-loads of money to politicians.


Protip:  if you ever look at the “Department” subheadings under my post title, and see the words “Advice” and “Gummint” appearing simultaneously, you’ll have fair warning as to where the post content will be going.

Reaction Part 1

Sometimes I wonder when I’m ever going to lose the childish impulse to react in the precise opposite way to officially-mandated stupidity.  Here’s one example of the latter:

Los Angeles would become the largest city in the U.S. to ban the sale of fur products if the City Council approves a proposed law backed by animal activists who say the multibillion-dollar fur industry is rife with cruelty.
The council was expected Tuesday to direct the city attorney to draft a law prohibiting the manufacture or sale of fur products in the city.
The ban would cover apparel made in whole or in part of fur – including clothing, handbags, shoes, hats, earmuffs, jewelry and keychains.

I don’t live in LA, of course, nor would I ever;  but if I did, I’d be buying one of these things tomorrow:

The paws are a nice touch, don’t you think?

I don’t know where I could wear it in order to create the greatest outrage, however;  perhaps some of my California Readers could suggest a few choice locations (e.g. Century City) in Comments?

Ten Inconvenient Facts For Liberals

The Spectator (U.S. version) lays them out in detail.

The more ambitious liberalism has become in its efforts to transform the United States, the more it has run up against one intransigent circumstance after another. For eight years, the idol worship of Barack Obama gave liberals confidence that they could remediate society and reeducate the citizens. But reality isn’t political. It doesn’t obey the principles of progressives. Some facts aren’t pliable.

Read and enjoy.  Feel free to discuss your favorite fact (if you can decide on just one) in Comments.

Quote Of The Day

Speaking of mandatory minimum-wage foolishness:

“Even in a robust economy such as we’re currently enjoying, the laws of supply and demand can’t be overridden. Restaurants still exist in a highly competitive environment and their profit margins remain generally low. A sudden increase in labor costs hits their bottom line immediately so they begin reducing the workforce and/or cutting back on hours for their servers and back of the house workers.
“The state is unable to artificially mandate prosperity without the free market responding to correct for the imbalance. That’s a lesson too many state and municipal governments seem painfully slow to learn.” — Jazz Shaw, via Insty.