Friday Night Movies

I seldom watch movies these days — “these days” being the last quarter-century — that for me to compile a list of “Best Movies Of Recent Times” would be a hopeless proposition.

However, Breitbart’s John Nolte is a movie buff, and as I generally agree with his opinions about those few movies I have  seen, it’s worth pointing to his “Best 53 Movies” lists:

I don’t agree with his choice for #1 — fine movie though it was — but it’s a good list nevertheless.

The only glaring omission I could see (inexplicably, it didn’t even make Nolte’s list of finalists) was 2009’s wonderful Taking Chance, in which Kevin Bacon (finally) gave a really good performance.

Have at it — and if (like me) you haven’t seen many of Nolte’s 53 movies, it should give you a decent reference list to look up on the various streaming channels.

That Would Be All Of Them

Over at Hot Air, Ed Morrissey introduces us to their movie-rating scale:

I have to say that the very last time I paid a full-price movie ticket was for the final Harry Potter  episode — and in fact, I went to the movie house for all the Potter movies.  If I recall correctly, the last non-Potter movie I saw in a cinema was Saving Private Ryan, and even that was some time after its initial release.

Every single other movie  over the past twenty-odd years has fallen into the #2 category.  As far as I’m concerned, there is not a movie in recent history worth the price of a movie ticket, or that is so good that I can’t wait to see it.

That doesn’t mean I think all movies have sucked in recent times — I’ve enjoyed lots of them, and Midnight In Paris, The Fabulous Baker Boys, A Good Year, The Incredibles  and Gosford Park (to name but some) I’ve not only watched but watched over and over again.

And I’m not even going to get into the horrible morass that is watching a movie in a cinema today:  people talking (loudly) all through the movie, people talking (loudly) on their phones all the way through the movie, people walking in and out of the cinema all through the movie, deafening movie soundtracks with bass turned up so high it can make one feel nauseated, trash and litter everywhere… do I need to go any further?

The only reason I’d go to the movies would be to watch Donald Trump winning his second term on Election Night in November 2020  — and that won’t be screened in cinemas anyway, so I can watch it for free on TV and (even better) see the mainstream TV personalities’ reaction:

(picture credit: some sick bastard on the Internet)

Tell me you wouldn’t pay money to see that.

Inexplicable

Try as I may, I fail to see the fascination with Katie Holmes, formerly Mrs. Tom Cruise.

This is not a knock on her, by the way:  at worst, she’s inoffensive — and she gets huge kudos for keeping their daughter out of the clutches of the foul Scientology cult.

Or maybe it’s just because  she’s the ex-wife of the dwarf action star (what I call the “Chelsea Clinton” effect) that the media seems to follow and photograph her all over the place;  and she continues to get movie roles, lots of them.  Once again, this is not a knock;  but she is unremarkable both in looks and talent:  girl-next-door pretty and capable of not screwing up a movie (the latter being no small thing, by the way).  Here she is in casual dress:

See what I mean?  And yet she’s played up — Vogue covers, etc. — and even when she’s in a movie, that praise continues.

For an example of the latter, one of the characters in the brilliant Thank You For Smoking  says of her that she has “world-class tits”, when it’s quite obvious that she doesn’t — not even close to world class, as the movie reveals later when she’s actually topless.  And the femme fatale  role she’s given… well, she’s not so fatale, as it turns out.

Granted, our Katie does clean up quite well:

…but given the amount of cosmetic trickery involved in shots like this, hell, even Chelsea Clinton can look passable (be charitable, willya?).  That said, Holmes certainly plays it for all it’s worth.

But I just don’t get it.  The movie business is lousy with gorgeous and egregiously-talented women, and yet Holmes gets more column inches and celluloid time than a lot of them.

Inexplicable.

Old-Time Favorite

Here’s a poll result which does not surprise me in the least:

World War II police drama Foyle’s War tops list of 21st Century TV shows that Britons want to see back onscreen, ahead of Downton Abbey, Life on Mars, and Spooks

Of all the TV shows I’ve watched over the past decade or so, none has given me as much pleasure as Foyle’s War, and not just because I’m a history buff.  I love the glimpse into wartime England, of course, and the gentle, almost leisurely pacing of the plots, but I also love the understated performance of the brilliant Michael Kitchen as DCS Foyle.  Compared at least to the other shows listed above — even Life on Mars — it’s in a different league.

And yes, I have the entire series on DVD.  There are dozens of worse ways to spend $80.

Finally, when I grow up, I want to dress like DCS Foyle:

…and drive around southern England in his 1936 Wolseley 14/56: