Not Surprising

Oh boo fucking hoo. A bunch of tatted-up, pierced and hairstyle-challenged kids are having difficulty landing jobs, and of course it’s all The Man’s fault:

In 2017, individuality and creativity are widely regarded as desirable traits in an potential employee.
But it seems some firms still judge prospective hires on appearance, as well as experience.
Jobseekers have been revealing the pettiest reasons they’ve ever been overlooked for a position on the anonymous secret-sharing app Whisper – and tattoos feature heavily in the surprising confessions.
One man with dreadlocks who was turned down for a job said it was not a coincidence that all the other staff members had ‘preppy hair’.
Another woman who had the word ‘hope’ tattooed on her wrist to cover a self-harm scar was informed she was out of the running as a result.

Here’s a pro tip to the author of this piece: employers are looking for individuality and creativity in employees, all right — but self-mutilation and peacocking attitudes aren’t that.

One commenter had the perfect response: “Make a statement about yourself with a tattoo, and be prepared to be judged by it.” 

I note that a large number of these jobs involve interaction with the public, and surprise, surprise: people are turned off by freaky-looking employees.

And then, of course, comes the classic whine of the narcissist: “We shouldn’t have to change our appearance (no matter how freakish); you should change your attitudes because insensitivity.”

Fuck off, the lot of you. Enjoy your welfare existence.

12 comments

  1. Yeah. does not surprise me they are unemployed and surprised.

    Maybe their insensitivity is what should be questioned. If I have to increase mine, or decrease it depending on how you are viewing it, why should they not take my feelings into account about there outlandish dress?

    it is not a one way street.

  2. Pro tip to young women: One of the easiest ways to upgrade your looks is to NOT get a tattoo. Tatted up girls are a dime a dozen…and none of them look the better for it.

    1. There are quite a few around the business where I work, and not one of them looks better because of them….

  3. Reminds me of a Heinlein quote from “The Happy Days Ahead”:

    “… but the important thing it implies is that a person born into, let us say, the Presbyterian Church is not being odd or unreasonable if he remains in it all his life despite having lost all faith; he’s merely being pragmatic. His wife and kids are there; he feels that church is a good influence on the kids, many of his friends are there. It’s a comfortable habit, one carrying with it a degree of prestige in the community.
    (But if he changes into a saffron robe and shaves his pate, then goes dancing down the street, shouting, “Hare Krishna!” he won’t keep his Chevrolet dealership very long. Theology has nothing to do with it.)”

    So, go ahead and be creative, and demonstrate individuality, but the guy you want something from (to give you a job) has his own problems. He has to make the nut every month, and looking like a dangerous creep works against that by scaring off customers.

    I hate eating out and having a server on my table with a lot of ink. It’s unappetizing, from a distance it makes it look as if they don’t wash.

    1. I won’t eat at a table where I’m being served by someone with visible tattoos. It means there’s nowhere I can eat in Austin, TX.

  4. Most tats I see are so garish, big and ill-placed, they scream “an insecure, immature person with bad judgement.”
    I’m fully expecting the lizard armed brigades to demand we taxpayers fund their “art” removal as a medical expense when they tire of being turned down for hiring or grow old and flabby, making their “art” look like a huge bruise with road rash.

  5. Never saw a tattoo I really liked.

    Then there’s the old Irish saying, “We wear on pride in our eyes, not on our skin”.

  6. I am bereft of tattoos, but if I were to get one, it’d be a long-since expired “Sell-By” date on my ass. Truth in advertising, etc.

    Jim
    Sunk New Dawn
    Galveston, TX

  7. Point to ponder: Years back, a sheriff was quoted, “I recognized him by his tattoos, so I arrested him.”

  8. As a quite young kid, I had observed a small number of the old man’s friends and associates had tattoos, all of the military service variety, usually maritime. One of his good friends used to drop by the house often, and one summer day I noticed he also had a tattoo, but instead of the usual military-related one on the outside of the forearm or bicep, it was a string of numbers inside the forearm.

    Later I inquired about the difference in tattoos and learned the meaning of those numbers.

    My young ambivalence about tattoos immediately changed to one of revulsion, and I’ve never viewed any sort of skin ink as anything but extremely negative since. Tattoos are an excellent litmus test for personality type and attitude, and have saved me a great deal of time over the years, in both personal and business dealings; while I understand the challenges of hiring, and maintaining, employees of reasonable quality, any business that permits visible ink on its customer service personnel is almost certainly one best avoided, and at the personal level, the high dollar investment – tattoos aren’t at all cheap – is indicative of a substantial misunderstanding regarding financial priorities.

  9. I wonder if the schmuck with the dreads was white. Very few things in life look sillier than a caucasian in dreadlocks.

    On the tattoos, I consider this; Many of the young people I see with tats are the children of MY generation, the Baby Boom. I grew up watching my fellow boomers, and a more hypocritical bunch of self-indulgent morons hasn’t plagued the earth since the French applied the Guillotine to the Aristos. A teen who rebels against THAT by getting a tattoo has my complete sympathy.

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