Way To Go, Roger

I always liked this guy, as much for his ability as his quiet, classy sportsmanship.  And here’s further reason why I should:

Roger Federer has revealed that he refuses to sleep in a bed without his wife of almost a decade by his side.
The Swiss-born tennis ace, 37, who is widely considered the greatest male player of all time, admitted that his wife, children and friends come first, despite his passion for the sport.
In an interview with The Sunday Times, Federer explained that his wife, whom he married in 2009, and their two sets of twins, who are home-schooled, travel everywhere with him when he is on tour.

Gives new meaning to the term “family man”, doesn’t it?.  And yeah, his massive income makes that lifestyle possible.  Doesn’t mean I shouldn’t applaud him for doing the right thing.

Predictably, Ishmael has an even better (and funnier) take on Federer’s grace and class.

And just for a bonus:  some Federer magic.  Enjoy.

Fan Support: The Rest

We conclude this scholarly study of international fan support of football (soccer) teams with a quick glimpse at the world outside the Americas and Europe, starting with the Far East:

And next door:

Meanwhile in (South) Africa:

Although it should be said that in Seffrica, as in the U.S., there’s more support for the oval ball:

While the same is true Down Under:

Then there are the Turkettes:

And speaking of Muslim assholes, let’s give some special appreciation to the ladies from Iran who support their national team.  Even though they are pretty much banned from watching the matches in Iran because Islam, they can support their team in away matches:

Although it should also be known that if they wore those same outfits in Teheran, they’d be stoned to death as whores.

One wonders what the ayatollahs would think of this Muslim creature from Albania:

In Iran or Saudi Arabia, she’d be stoned to death;  here in the U.S. of A., she’d be offered a modeling contract.  Which system is better?  I report, you decide.

Fan Support: The Other Europe

Continuing with the “countries recently invaded by Germany” theme, we have the lady supporters of Eastern European football, starting (as did the Germans) with Poland:

A little south, we have Croatia:

Which is next door to Serbia:

And then there are their Slavic cousins, Russia:

To the surprise of probably no-one, it was discovered that Russia’s most-photographed female fan (above) is a porno actress in real life (not that there’s anything wrong with that, of course — anyone can support their country, and should).

And to end this segment of female fan support, we have Greece, a country nominally in Western Europe, but geographically south of Poland, so there:

We’ll wrap up this series, so to speak, next week with a look at the rest of the world.  As always, feel free to vote for your favorite(s) in Comments.

Fan Support: Over There

Last week we studied the fan support of football in the Western Hemisphere, so now we’ll cross the Atlantic, starting with mid-Atlantic Iceland:

I know these ladies are somewhat more demure than the average we’ve seen up till now, but let’s not forget that it gets kinda chilly in Iceland.  Staying with the Scandinavian types, there are the original Vikings in Denmark:

…followed by Sweden:

I know Swedes all speak English, and there’s proof.  Anyway, let’s move a little south:

And across the border:

Over the Pyrenees mountains:

While over the Channel, we have the English roses:

[insert]  Longtime Friend and Reader TrueBrit sends me the following, to highlight England’s winning spirit (and if it makes you giggle, you’re not alone):

Back over in Euroland, there are the Low Countries (Belgium and Holland respectively), who despite their diminutive size, always seem to punch well above their weight class, so to speak:

And lurking just over the Rhine, the Old Enemy (in so many ways):

…and their cousins-in-crime, Austria:

But let’s not talk about The War.  The Swiss were neutral, in any case:

Moving south, there’s the confusingly-named Azzuri (despite having national colors of green, white and red, Italy plays in sky-blue jerseys because Italy):

Okay, you can all stop panting now, and vote for your favorites in Comments.  In two weeks’ time:  Eastern Europe.

Fan Support: The Americas

Today we will study the lengths to which people will support their home team.  By “people”, of course, I mean “ladies” and by “support” I mean “showing up at a football stadium wearing your national team’s colors, more or less”.  Let’s start off with the South Americans, because one has to start somewhere:

One would imagine that Brazil does just as well in this department, and one would be right:

But those are large, populous countries so one would expect a high level of tottie-ness.  What about the smaller South American ones?  Let’s start with Ecuador:

…and then Paraguay:

Peru:

Chile:

   

And let’s not forget tiny Honduras:

I know, Honduras is technically in Central America — which brings me on to Mexico:

If I may channel Top Gear‘s Jeremy Clarkson for a moment, that does not look like yer typical Mexican housemaid as found in the U.S.A., does it?  And speaking of El Norte, we have:

…but frankly, I think we save our best for the other kind of football:

…and especially at the college level:

Next week, we’ll cross the Atlantic to resume our study.  Oh, and feel free to vote for your favorite fan(s) in Comments.

That’s More Like It: Carnoustie Bares Its Fangs

It seems as though the Carnoustie weather only gave the players a false sense of security on Thursday, setting them up for Friday.  And it worked.

The vast crowds were not dodging imaginary lava, of course, but rain. Real rain. The sort of rain that turns course maps into mulch and makes bunkers look like mud. “I’m waiting here,” said one glum spectator, who had joined a swelling mob of clambering fans in watching a big screen from the comfort of the Open’s food tent. “I’ll have to go out later.”

By mid-morning, the food hall was part-cafe, part-viewing gallery and part-changing room. Those wise enough to bring waterproofs had found a place to pull them on, while others had been drawn to the smell of bacon butties. One woman, clearly unmoved by the prospect of exchanging her warmth for live golf, was simply reading a book. Another spectator told the Daily Telegraph that this was his first trip to the Open since Royal Troon in 2016, when the rain fell even harder. “At least I got a free course map,” he said.
It should be made clear that this weather is not unusual. This is Scotland. It rains. Get over it, right? But it was still hard to avoid the contrast between this misery and the opening day here, when Carnoustie provided a passable impression of a Mediterranean beach resort. On Thursday, the better-hydrated spectators fell asleep on the oversized, inflatable cushions. On Friday, those cushions drooped mournfully in the dirt like a herd of tired walruses.

It could always be worse, as they say, and it has been far worse than this at the Open. The conditions were so bad during the third round of the 2002 tournament in Muirfield that Trevor Immelman, the South African player, said he thought the world was going to end.

That braying sound you hear is Kim laughing uproariously.

(And thanks to Reader Pkudude, who sent me the link.)