Different Focus

Gentle Readers, I bring you the old:

2018 Maserati Gran Turismo

…and its replacement, the new:

2021 Maserati MC20

Now I know that they are, in essence, two different cars.  The older GT is a tourer (Gran Turismo) after all, and while it is very fast, it’s neither a racer nor a supercar — both of which are what the MC20 is going to be.  Indeed, the MC 20 heralds the (long-overdue) return of Maserati to racing, which means that they’ll be competing with the likes of Ferrari, Porsche, Lamborghini and Corvette in Group B racing, maybe even at Le Mans (but in 2022 and not 2021, I suspect).

The MC20, therefore, is Maserati’s first real “supercar” since the Ghibli of the late 1960s and early 70s:

…although it too was strictly speaking a tourer — I don’t think it was ever raced — but at the time, there were only a few cars which compared to it.

(I know, there was the MC12, but that was never going to be a street car, really, no matter how hard they tried to make it so:

…and the $2 million-plus sticker didn’t help much.)

But it’s a new dawn, now.

I can’t wait to see the MC20 racing, and Maserati racing again.  Presto, ragazzi.

Although like all supercars, it’s going to be hell in the parking lot:

Don’t care.  Details are here.

5 comments

  1. I remember back to my youth the exotic Maserati Tipo 60/61 birdcage of the early 1960s. They were made of a maze of small tubing, hence the nickname birdcage, covered in a hand-formed aluminum skin.
    One sold at Sotheby’s in 2013 for over two million.

  2. Kim, you are aware that this new Maserati is borne into existence due to the slow death of Alfa Romeo, yes?

    Check out each makes website: Alfa has essentially 3 models (Stelvio, Giulia and 4C Spider, the latter soon to be dead like Boris the Spider, as sung by The Who’s John Entwhistle), while Maserati has grown to 4 models.

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