Object Lesson #2

And, children, this is why you need to carry your handgun with you at all times:

Several shots were fired at a truck flying a “Make America Great Again” flag and an American flag on a highway in Indianapolis Tuesday afternoon, Fox 59 reported. Luckily, no one was hurt in the incident, which looks like a possible case of left-wing terrorism.
Indiana State Police say a newer white 4-door Chevrolet Malibu with a Louisiana plate pulled up next to the pickup truck. A black male passenger held a handgun out of the window and fired several shots at the pro-Trump truck. Police say no one was in injured in the incident. The driver of the Malibu was described as a black male around the age of 23. The passenger was described as a light skinned black male with a sleeve tattoo on his right arm.

Somebody tell me if the shooter was some random White asshole and the target a Black woman with a Hillary! bumper sticker, that the media reaction would have been somewhat different. On second thoughts, don’t bother. We all know the answer to that one.

But seriously: this violence by the Left can only be addressed by a violent reaction, i.e. the intended target returning fire. Hence the need to have a gun with you at all times.

Just remember that we didn’t start this foolishness. But if we’re confronted with it, like in the above scenario, we are damn sure going to finish it — if, that is, we’re prepared for it.

Carry your gun. All the time.


Update: from Longtime Reader GMC70 in Comments, thoughts which really deserve to be part of this post:

Just remember to learn the law of self-defense in your jurisdiction, and apply it correctly.
And as an attorney, I’ll throw in gratis my recommendations should you ever have to use that weapon to defend life:
1) make sure YOU (or someone at your direction) call 911, and request assistance.  Too often, the “victim” is simply the 1st person to call 911. State to the operator (it’s recorded, remember) that “I was forced to fire my weapon to defend myself” or words to that effect as appropriate.  DO NOT elaborate or go into detail with the operator.  And make sure that if an ambulance is appropriate, you notify them of that.
2) when law enforcement arrives, DO NOT have your gun in your hand unless absolutely necessary; you do not want to be mistaken for the BG.  Acknowledge the obvious – your rounds are in the goblin, and say, again, “I was forced to defend myself (or another) with my weapon,” as appropriate.  STOP THERE.  Do not elaborate.  For God’s sake DO NOT – EVER – LIE TO LAW ENFORCEMENT.  You can refuse to talk, but you cannot lie.  And it will not help you, in the long run.  There are too many ways for lies to be discovered for what they are.
3) note witnesses, and make sure their names and addresses are recorded.  If necessary, do this yourself; you may not be able to rely on law enforcement to do it.
4) At some point you are likely to be asked to make a detailed statement.  POLITELY DECLINE TO DO SO.  Personally, my statement will  “officer, I’m rattled by this experience and I need to collect my thoughts (or get checked out by medical, if the circumstances warrant) and clear my head before I make a statement.”   They may arrest you – let them.  DO NOT MAKE ANY STATEMENTS WITHOUT CONSULTING AN EXPERIENCED AND QUALIFIED ATTORNEY.   At this point, LEOs may not be your friends.  If they’re good officers, they’ll understand; if they’re not, making a statement may not help you, and could hurt you.  DO NOT hurt yourself by making statements without collecting your thoughts and carefully considering the impact of the statements.  Remember – as a general rule, when an officer takes a suspect into a room for questioning (and at this point, you’re a suspect), he’s not there to get the facts.  He’s there to get a confession.  And confession and truth (or facts) are not necessarily the same thing.
5) After consulting with an attorney, and considering what is in your best interests, you may submit a statement and/or submit to questions – with your attorney present.  And how you proceed from there should be in full consultation with a qualified attorney.
Remember – trials are not about truth, they are about the perception of truth.  The only “truth” that matters, at that point, is what those 12 people in the jury box decide is the truth.  Do not give the State ammunition to prosecute you.  And some prosecutors may want to prosecute you just for the principle of the thing – I’ve seen it.

Here’s to hoping you’ll never need that advice.

11 comments

  1. Just remember to learn the law of self-defense in your jurisdiction, and apply it correctly.

    And as an attorney, I’ll throw in gratis my recommendations should you ever have to use that weapon to defend life:
    1) make sure YOU (or someone at your direction) call 911, and request assistance. Too often, the “victim” is simply the 1st person to call 911. State to the operator (it’s recorded, remember) that “I was forced to fire my weapon to defend myself” or words to that effect as appropriate. DO NOT elaborate or go into detail with the operator. And make sure that if an ambulance is appropriate, you notify them of that.
    2) when law enforcement arrives, DO NOT have your gun in your hand unless absolutely necessary; you do not want to be mistaken for the BG. Acknowledge the obvious – your rounds are in the goblin, and say, again, “I was forced to defend myself (or another) with my weapon,” as appropriate. STOP THERE. Do not elaborate. For God’s sake DO NOT – EVER – LIE TO LAW ENFORCEMENT. You can refuse to talk, but you cannot lie. And it will not help you, in the long run. There are too many ways for lies to be discovered for what they are.
    3) note witnesses, and make sure their names and addresses are recorded. If necessary, do this yourself; you may not be able to rely on law enforcement to do it.
    4) At some point you are likely to be asked to make a detailed statement. POLITELY DECLINE TO DO SO. Personally, my statement will “officer, I’m rattled by this experience and I need to collect my thoughts (or get checked out by medical, if the circumstances warrant) and clear my head before I make a statement.” They may arrest you – let them. DO NOT MAKE ANY STATEMENTS WITHOUT CONSULTING AN EXPERIENCED AND QUALIFIED ATTORNEY. At this point, LEOs may not be your friends. If they’re good officers, they’ll understand; if they’re not, making a statement may not help you, and could hurt you. DO NOT hurt yourself by making statements without collecting your thoughts and carefully considering the impact of the statements. Remember – as a general rule, when an officer takes a suspect into a room for questioning (and at this point, you’re a suspect), he’s not there to get the facts. He’s there to get a confession. And confession and truth (or facts) are not necessarily the same thing.
    5) After consulting with an attorney, and considering what is in your best interests, you may submit a statement and/or submit to questions – with your attorney present. And how you proceed from there should be in full consultation with a qualified attorney.

    Remember – trials are not about truth, they are about the perception of truth. The only “truth” that matters, at that point, is what those 12 people in the jury box decide is the truth. Do not give the State ammunition to prosecute you. And some prosecutors may want to prosecute you just for the principle of the thing – I’ve seen it.

    Here’s to hoping you’ll never need that advice.

  2. ALWAYS be armed, and know how and when to use your chosen arm, be it a firearm, knife, fist, or, in this case, a large pickup truck. If both vehicles were moving at the time of the attack, wouldn’t it have been fitting if the truck had side-slammed the smaller vehicle into a guardrail? I know, hindsight is 20/20, and I’ve no doubt my first inclination would be to get away, but I can have a Walter Mitty moment once in a while.
    IB

  3. My thought if they are side by side is to hit the brakes, get behind the sucker and get his license plate number and try to stay back behind him while calling the police. At the same time be ready to defend yourself if he slows down and wants an encounter. I would much rather get on with my life and not have to deal with the paper work and legal hassle of returning fire unless necessary. Shooting at a moving vehicle from a moving vehicle could be very difficult, especially if you are driving and it is my understanding we can be held accountable for bullets that go astray. Of course it is easy to sit in front of a computer and think about this stuff compared to being a person being fired at with adrenaline flowing and heartbeats pumping up so that’s just what I think I would do.

  4. I have some friends with dash cams (mostly for evidence in a traffic accident) but would also work for this, particularly the slow down and get his license plate scenario as the camera can do that automatically while you make your next evasion move/ prepare to engage

  5. Always be armed, but in such a situation, don’t forget the weapon that is most ready to hand: The truck. Ram the bastard. I assure you, it is considerably more difficult to get more rounds off when you’re eating guard rail. Moreover, even if the bad guy does get away, he’ll now have paint and damage consistent with your vehicle that will help the cops locate them.

  6. The truck would be my first choice. Do a cots maneuver on them and then run them into the ditch. Call 911 from a ways down the road and ask for an ambulance. Check for bullet holes in your truck.

    Been contemplating a dash cam on endless loop just for such a problem.

  7. I don’t know what the opinions of Massad Ayoob are here and I’m just seeking comment about one of his recommendations I recall reading.

    Tell the responding officer after your brief statement about being forced to defend yourself: “I called 911” (if you made the call), and “I will sign the complaint”. Especially important if the goblin is awake and talking.

    IANAL so asking; is that valid, and good advice?

    And I’m also looking at both dash and rear view cameras. Even without a shooting scenario, there is an epidemic of insurance fraud going on.

  8. Yea, that’s fine. Just stop there. Talk to a lawyer before you give a statement to police.

    And Kim, your inclusion of my little bit of advice in your post is one of the greatest compliments I’ve ever gotten. I may have to put that in my resume . . .

    And if it helps keep one poor soul from ending up in the system unnecessarily, it’s worth it.

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